Coping with a Disaster or Traumatic Event

After a disaster, it is important to take care of your emotional health.

Pay attention to how you and your family members are feeling and acting. Taking care of your emotional health will help you think clearly and react to urgent needs to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Follow these tips to help you and your family recover or find support.

Download PDF.

9 Springtime Activities for Every Type of Senior

Welcome in the cheery spring weather with some new activities for your senior.

As spring is all about beginnings and renewals, what better way to enjoy the season than to explore some new hobbies.

Here’s a list of 9 springtime activities to help your loved seniors make the most of their time.

There is always something for everyone!

For active seniors:

Grow a vegetable garden.

Or flower, or fruit, or herb. It doesn’t matter what kind of garden your senior plants, as long as your senior is out in the fresh air and sunshine. This can be a great alone time activity. And, it can also be a great social activity if done with a gardening club.

Visit a nature reserve.

Nature walks are relaxing, alternative to hikes. Hiking can be strenuous for seniors, but walking around a nature reserve gives them the same amount of outdoor pleasure and exercise. Make it a trip and spend the day at a nearby nature reserve. Or, make it a quick activity and go for just an hour or two.

Start spring cleaning.

Like we mentioned before, spring is all about starting anew. And nothing says starting anew than a nice clean house. Kick off the springtime by throwing away old baggage and clearing a space for the new. Not to mention, a dust-free house makes for easier breathing.

For the meditative seniors:

Have a picnic.

If your senior is fond of simple relaxation, going for a picnic is a perfect way to get your senior soaking up the sun’s vitamin D and enjoying some crisp air. You can go to a nearby park. Or, you can stay in the comfort of your lawn.

Try outdoor yoga classes.

Outdoor yoga is another great way to get your senior outdoors. Yoga is perfect for seniors who love to meditate and unwind. And, it’s got plenty of health benefits to boot.

Go fishing.

If you’re looking for a quiet activity, away from others, fishing is a great escape. Your senior can enjoy buying a rod, trying new baits, and, best of all, catching some delicious dinner.

For the artsy seniors:

Take a walk along the beach.

Most people don’t go to the beach until the summer. Which makes going to the beach during springtime that much better, because you’ll have the whole beach to yourself. It may be too cold to actually swim, but walking along the shore, napping in the sun, and collecting seashells is always fun. And, the ocean air is great for healthy breathing.

Host a paint night.

Or even paint and sip. This could be a great night to bring the family together. Or, a time to bring over your senior’s friends. Whomever the company, it’s just important that your seniors socialize and have a good time.

For seniors at home:

Explore virtual reality.

Virtual reality headsets let you explore the world without going far. Your senior can fish, hike, walk, you name it. All from the comfort of their own home. Although slightly expensive, VR headsets are truly worthwhile experience for seniors stuck at home.

Senior Caregiver Health at Risk: Facts, Signs, and Solutions

When it comes to seniors and caregiving, attention is always placed on the seniors’ well-being.

Which makes sense.

However, there’s another important player in the caregiving cycle that deserves attention too. And, that another player is the one giving the care- the dutiful family member who spends the day in and day out helping to care for the loved senior, and who often gets overlooked or overworked.

In this article, we’ll go through the facts of caregiver health, the signs of an overworked caregiver, and some practical solutions.

The facts behind caregiver health.

As more and more baby boomers enter their senior age, more family members are being called upon to care for their parents, grandparents, uncles, and aunts.

While caregiving is amazing to work and truly exemplifies the meaning of family, it can also be quite a strenuous job. Especially, for those family members who also have their own spouses and children to take care of. Needless to say, the time commitment and workload of caregiving can be difficult to manage.

Unfortunately, this often leads to overworked or overwhelmed caregivers, which can result in poor health. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that of the 18 million Americans who are informal caregivers (meaning, they are not paid for their caregiving services), about 1 in 5 are in roughly moderate or bad health.

Essentially, while caregivers are working to keep their loved seniors in good health, they are letting their own health slip away. A sad consequence that we, at AmeriBest, aim to prevent.

The signs of an overworked caregiver.

When it comes to determining someone’s health, direct questions don’t always work.

Because it is not uncommon for caregivers to brush off questions with “I’m fine” or “I have it under control.” And the problem is that these caregivers really might really be fine at the moment. But burn out can happen in an instant. Informal caregivers are fine until they’re not fine. At which point their physical and mental health may be at serious risk.

So, while open and honest communication is usually the best option, sometimes a little something else is required. Something called tactful observation. 

If you’re worried about a caregiver you love, look out for these tell-tale signs of burnout:

  1. Persistent tiredness
  2. Anxiety or sadness
  3. Forgetfulness
  4. Weak immune system (I.e. getting sick easily and often)
  5. Loss of weight

Obviously, everyone exhibits signs of burnout differently. But, if you notice any of these signs within yourself or a caregiver you love, consider that it might be time to intervene and help.

The option for help.

Whether it’s for you, a friend, or a loved one- don’t be afraid to call a home care agency for a bit of extra help.

Caregivers often avoid calling for help because they see it as a lack of responsibility on their part. They worry that by calling in someone else to do the job, they are casting off their beloved seniors.

But if you know what home care really is, you know that’s not the case.

With at-home care, family caregivers can come in and out as they please. There are no visiting times and no need to call in advance. Family caregivers can help monitor their seniors’ schedules and care, while also having a professional home care aide to lean on for support and advice.

With at-home care, seniors never feel alone and caregivers never feel overwhelmed.

Stay Up-To-Date on The Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Philadelphia, PA

Dear AmeriBest clients, caregivers and staff, here are the resources for you to stay updated on coronavirus (COVID-19).

What you need to know about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) – CDC Brochure.

COVID-19 in Pennsylvania updates – Pennsylvania DOH Brochure.

For more updates by the CDC, please visit their website:
English
Chinese 中文
Spanish Español

WHAT IS Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)?

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. The virus that causes COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China.

Coronavirus, a group of viruses that cause diseases in mammals and birds. In humans, the virus causes respiratory infections. 3D illustration.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS of Coronavirus COVID-19?

Symptoms of the COVID-19 can include:
• Fever
• Cough
• Shortness of breath

The symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure. Reported illnesses have ranged from people with little to no symptoms to people being severely ill and dying.

WHAT CAN YOU DO To Protect Yourself and Your Loved Ones Against Coronavirus?

  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, do not use your hands!
  • Clean surfaces frequently, such as countertops, light switches, cell phones and other frequently touched areas.
    Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Contain – if you are sick, stay home until you are feeling better.
Healthy lifestyle, hygiene, and prevention of viral and bacterial diseases.

Learn More American Heart Month This February

Humans are constantly worrying about dangers across the world, deep at sea, or high in the sky. We indulge our fantasies with far off worries, forgetting to look at what is actually nearby.

And in doing so, we miss the dangers lurking right outside our own doorsteps. Dangers that could otherwise be avoided. Dangers that need our full attention.

Which leads us to the topic of heart disease, one of the leading causes of death.

So this February, focus on the here and now, and help us honor American Heart Month.

What is American Heart Month?

Thousands of Americans suffer from heart diseases, heart attacks, and heart failures. Unfortunately, seniors and those around them often don’t recognize the symptoms of heart disease. This lets the problem sit unattended to and grow until it’s almost too late.

That’s why February’s American Hearth Month is so important. This is the time of year that Americans all over the country dedicate time and energy to bringing valuable, life-saving information to the attention of all.

Learn more about heart disease and help raise awareness.

Your knowledge just might save your loved one’s life.

What are some signs of heart disease?

There are many known types of heart disease. But what most of them have in common is that they are essentially a buildup of plaque around the arteries. The problem with this is that the plaque then takes up room in the arteries, narrowing the amount of space that the blood can move through. This means, that the heart has to work that much harder to pump blood through the body.

Because the heart is over worked and for less blood circulation, heart disease can often lead to heart attacks, strokes, or heart failure.

Of course, different heart diseases exhibit different symptoms.

However, here are some to be aware of:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness
  • Chest pain
  • Skin discoloration
  • Irregular heartbeat

What are ways to prevent heart disease?

Eat healthy.

Foods like fish, oatmeal, olive oil, and flaxseed are considered to be great foods for the heart.

Exercise regularly.

Getting in regular exercise is essential to having a healthy heart. It doesn’t have to be an intense workout, but walks and cardio workouts are great for getting the blood pumping and the oxygen in your body moving.

Avoid stress.

Too much stress, and for too long, can actually have physical ramifications for one’s heart. So take things step by step, avoiding too much stress.

What to do if you see someone having a heart attack?

If you notice your senior experiencing any symptoms of a heart attack, don’t panic. Call 911 immediately, even if you’re unsure. For the sake of your loved one, it’s better to make a mistake calling than not to call at all. And, trust us, the police will be forgiving.

If your senior is unconscious and help has not arrived yet, start CPR. A dispatcher from the police station should talk you through the motions. Or at least how to do basic chest compressions.

Stay alert and educated for American Heart Month.

10 Ways to Help Seniors Avoid Flu Season

Keep the house warm.

This is one of the most basic things on the list, but one of the most vital. Seniors, like all of us, catch viruses more easily when they get chilled. For that reason, it’s important to keep the house warm. Turn up the heat at night, and always keep throw blankets on hand.

Exercise regularly.

Though it may seem counterintuitive to go outside, fresh air and sunlight are necessary for a healthy body. Not only does the sun give off crucial vitamins, it also increases serotonin levels in the body, which helps with a good night’s sleep. And, you can’t have a healthy body without deep restorative sleep.

Eat superfoods.

Super foods are nature’s gift to us. Foods like ginger, spinach, kale, turmeric, and garlic are natural immunity boosters. They’re easy to add to almost any meal, and taste good too.

Don’t skimp out on your super foods.

Drink lots of liquids.

As always, water is the best option. However, as long as your senior is getting in enough fluids- coffee, tea, and seltzer are good choices too.

Wash your hands.

This is a super easy way to prevent outside germs from spreading inside your home. It’s a great habit to develop sooner rather than later.

Wash your hands whenever you come back into the house. Use soap. And, make sure your senior does too.

Get a flu shot.

It’s important to get your flu shots before the flu season starts. Or, at least at the very beginning of it. Don’t wait until peak contagion time, because by then you or your senior may have already caught the flu.

Explore natural remedies.

If you’re not one for flu shots, look into natural preventative measures. Consult with your doctor about which vitamins and minerals your senior’s body may be lacking. Then, look to fill those missing nutrients with supplements.

Think positively.

Sometimes, ill health stems from ill thoughts.
In other words- mind over matter.

Keep your senior thinking positively to keep your senior healthy. If you feel your loved one is having trouble with this, try playing happy music around the house and make sure he or she is getting enough sunshine.

Keep the house clean.

Germs tend to grow more easily in unclean areas.
Not untidy, but unclean. This means that it’s important to clean regularly, and not let the dirt pile up. Wipe down countertops, soak the dishes, sweep the floors, and dust around the windowsills and corners.

Your lungs will thank you for the cleaning.

Don’t touch your face.

A good tip when you’re outside of the house is to never touch your face. Specifically, your mouth, nose, and eyes. Getting germs on your hands is bad enough, but it’s even worse when you give those germs direct access to your insides.

So, always be weary of where you put your hands.